2

Weaving Tips: Low Density Vs High Density Warping

Have you ever wondered how a weaver can create both a fine weaving and a thicker weaving using the same loom? One way to accomplish this is to change the density of your warp (aka vertical strings).

Low Vs High Density Warp Comparison

So what’s the difference between low density vs high density warping?

Low Density Warping  is when there is more space between each of the warp strings. With more space between each string, there will be fewer strings across the same width of warp. This is great for beginners or when you want to create a project using roving wool or thicker yarns.

High Density Warping  is when the warp strings are much closer together. With the strings closer together, you end up with more of them across the same width of warp. This is useful when you want to create highly detailed weaves with various shapes or if you simply want a tighter looking weaving.

So how can you create a low or high density warp on the same loom?

Low Density Warping

Let’s start with low density warping first.

High Vs Low Density Warping - Materials

For this demonstration, I’ll be using my own little cardboard loom. You may recall that I used it to create these beginner-level DIY Woven Coasters:

Make some super cute woven coasters using cardboard, yarn and needle. So simple and beautiful to create. A great project for beginner weavers!

If you have a store-bought or homemade notch loom (named for its notches across the top and bottom), you can follow along.

(Note:  For those with peg looms, namely looms with pegs instead of notches along the top and bottom, I’ll have a few words to share about them at the end of this post.)

To create a low density warp, slide the tail end of your warp string into your first chosen notch.

High Vs Low Density Weaving

Here is a bird’s eye view.

High Vs Low Density Weaving

Next, pull the yarn string down and slide into the corresponding notch directly below.

High Vs Low Density Weaving

Wrap the string around the back side of the small flap and back up through the notch to the right.

High Vs Low Density Weaving

Here is a bird’s eye view of the string wrapped around the flap.

High Vs Low Density Weaving

And here’s a view of what that looks like on the back (flipped over so that the bottom edge is now at the top) .

High Vs Low Density Weaving

Flip the loom back down.

Next, pull the warp string upwards.

High Vs Low Density Weaving

Tuck the string into the next notch.

High Vs Low Density Weaving

Then wrap the yarn around the back side of the flap and pull through the next notch.

High Vs Low Density Weaving

Continue repeating these steps until you are satisfied with the width of your warp.

High Vs Low Density Weaving - Low Density Warp Complete

High Density Warping

When creating a high density warp (i.e., more vertical strings that are closer together), you start in the same way as you do with low density warping.

Tuck your tail into the first notch along the top, pull down, tucking the string into the corresponding notch below. Wrap the string around the flap and to the right, pulling the yarn through the second notch and then back up.

High Vs Low Density Warping

Now, get ready to start creating a higher density warp.

Instead of tucking the yarn you’ve pulled upwards into the notch to the right, tuck it into the first notch again. Yes, you read that correctly. Go back to that first notch.

High Vs Low Density Warping

As before, wrap the yarn around the back and pull through the second notch to the right.

High Vs Low Density Warping

Pull the yarn down and tuck it into the corresponding notch along the bottom, which already has a yarn string tucked into it.

High Vs Low Density Warping

Wrap around the back of the flap and tuck into the notch to the right. Then pull the yarn upwards towards the top and tuck into the second notch one more time.

High Vs Low Density Warping

Here is a full view of what you’ve created so far.

High Vs Low Density Warping

Repeat the steps, making sure that you have tucked the yarn into each notch twice as you make your way across. By tucking  your yarn into the same notch twice, you are creating a dense warp across the loom.

High Vs Low Density Warping - High Density Warp Complete

Here is a side-by-side comparison.

High Vs Low Density Warping

It’s really that easy!

A Word About Peg & Nail Looms

If you have a peg loom (pegs across the top and bottom) like this one…

Learn the art of wall weaving in this basic introduction to materials, terms used, and how to create your own one-of-a-kind wall weaving for your home. A beautiful alternative to traditional wall art.

…you will not be able to create any higher density than is set by the pegs (at least not that I am aware of).

If you have your own DIY Nail Loom, however, like this one that I made,

How to Make a Basic Loom - This basic, budget-friendly loom is a great way to get into the weaving trend without spending a ton of money. Easy to make and even easier to use for a wide variety of weaving projects:)

…then you have the luxury of setting your nails as close as you’d like.

How To Make a Loom - adding nails

(To see how to make your own, see “How To Make a Basic Loom”)

I set mine at a quarter inch apart, which can create tight weaves, like this DIY Woven Pillow.

DIY woven pillow

And then, if you want to create a lower density warp, simply wrap your warp strings around every second nail. (The same applies when creating lower density warps with notch looms).

Versatility in weaving is key when you begin experimenting with different shapes, designs and yarns. The more options you have with your loom, the more opportunities you have to maximize its usefulness. I hope this tutorial helps you see just how flexible you can be when using the same loom for all your weaving projects, big and small.

Happy weaving 🙂

Creating a variety of weaving designs on the same loom can be tricky. But by creating low or high density warps, you can maximize your weaving designs on the same loom. This step-by-step tutorial shows you just how easy this is

 

 

  • Michelle
    February 20, 2017 at 9:02 am

    You make me so happy Jelica. Your weaving tutorials are always the best, all I want to do is make some of the amazing things you’ve done. Thank you for sharing how you do it in such an easy to understand way.

    • Jelica
      February 20, 2017 at 9:32 am

      Awww, thanks so much Michelle. I enjoy weaving so much and just love sharing all that I am learning along the way. I’m so glad you enjoy these posts. I enjoy creating them 🙂